found photos, drawings, videos & whatnot, gathered in one place for visual inspiration.

maintained by designer/developer/musician michael bond aka bond@datawaslost.net

scanzen:

Mapping the Milky Way. William Herschel’s galaxy maps (facsimile), 2009 (originals 1784–85). 

William Herschel and his sister Caroline made the first maps of the structure of our galaxy. For two years they surveyed thousands of stars, using their brightness to estimate distance from Earth.

Source: Science Museum - Courtesy of Royal Astronomical Society

Aliza Morrell - Untitled (Roller Rink), 2013.

(Source: newamericanpaintings.com)

nevver:

Nobody wants to be here and nobody wants to leave, Grant Haffner

Soviet Fabric Designs from the 20s and 30s. (via leftways)

From The Hero With A Thousand Faces by Joseph Campbell (1949), p. 256.

thatsbutterbaby:

In his Discourse on Meteorology, Descartes includes this image of the mathematics of stargazing

themorningnews:

Amy Park’s watercolors of New York depict the city from the perspective of a plane flying at 1,200 feet, along the Hudson River.

New York From 1,200 Feet by Amy Park

50watts:

Three musical scores via MoMA, Exhibiting Fluxus: Keeping Score in Tokyo 1955–1970: A New Avant-Garde

Yasunao Tone. Anagram for Strings. 1961 (Fluxus Edition released 1963). Score. Master for the Fluxus Edition, typed and drawn by George Maciunas.

Toshi Ichiyanagi. Music for Electric Metronome. 1960 (Fluxus Edition announced 1963). Score. Master for the Fluxus Edition, typed and drawn by George Maciunas.

Toshi Ichiyanagi. IBM for Merce Cunningham. 1960 (Fluxus Edition announced 1963). Score. Master for the Fluxus Edition, typed and drawn by George Maciunas.

Traité des couleurs servant à la peinture à l’eau by A. Boogert, 1692. An early guide to mixing watercolors - the entire 800 pages are viewable here.

Via the fantastic Erik Kwakkel, who has more information and scans at his blog.

(Source: thisiscolossal.com)

skunkbear:

WHEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE!

I was recently reminded how much I still enjoy this endlessly zooming video from 1968, “Powers of Ten”:

You’ve got to watch the video for the narration and the kickin’ soundtrack. For a modern, interactive take, check out “The Scale of the Universe" by Cary Huang. Get some perspective!